The Power and Beauty of No

Last year I was faced with a "say no situation". I was working full time, but my job was not being funded for the next year. I could choose to interview for a full time position in a context that didn't appeal to me or I could accept a part time job which required no interview and involved work I knew I'd love. In addition, the part time job was a step down from the position I had. I chose to accept the part time job.

My mom, who is the most supportive person in my world, questioned my decision. She didn't see the wisdom in trading a full time job for a part time one. "How will you pay your bills?", she asked. I'd asked myself the same question.


My intuition told me to take the part time job, but just to be sure I consulted my body as well. I sat in meditation, closed my eyes, and said aloud "I have accepted the full time job." I noted that my stomach juices started gurgling. Then I said,
"I have not accepted the full time job" and my stomach settled. My intuition and my body were in accord and I'd made a decision.

Saying no to that full time job obviously opened up time in my schedule. When another offer was presented, I was able to say yes and mean it. I took on consulting work through my own business Kimestry Arts Network, which in combination with the part time job, was more lucrative than the full time job.

There is power and beauty in saying no. Once we are clear about what we desire, saying no to things that are out of alignment with what we say we want lets the creative force in the universe know that we are serious! Saying no leaves space in our lives for what we do want rather than filling up space with what we don't want.



Last week I was offered additional teaching work this summer. I've been enjoying going to the gym during the day, enjoying the sunshine, having lunch with friends and teaching only two night per week. I said no to the offer and my stomach didn't lurch. There is power and beauty in saying no.

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